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of the two suspects who stayed to watch the carnage before casually walking away. joining me is jim maxwell, retired fbi agent and also bob baer, bill gavin and cnn national security analyst, fran townsend. we'll bring back assistant director of the fbi, chris swecker. let me start with you, jim maxwell, since you're here. you're a retired special agent who specialized in the bomb area. this is the kind of bomb that we're talking about, a pressure cooker. fairly crude device but in this case, extremely effectively executed. what do you make of the development today with the two suspects given that it clearly shows a team? >> yes. this type of device basically, based on what i've seen so far, would be used to deliver low explosives, something that moves 3300 feet per second, less than that amount. and this device is popular for low explosives, the common vessel would be a pipe bomb. well, in this particular case, they decided to use this kind of vessel and what it does is it allows low explosives to build up pressure inside the vessel and then it will increase the potency of the explosion by
wants a review by the intelligence committee. jim acosta joins us now from capitol hill. jim, what did she say exactly? >> well, anderson, senator feinstein, who is the chair of the senate intelligence committee, she did not say that the fbi dropped the ball. she didn't want to go that far, but she does want a review of what the fbi knows about all this and to get at what tamerlan tsarnaev was up to when he went back to russia back in 2012. he apparently made a trip there. and this was after he was apparently interviewed by the fbi back in 2011. the fbi said in a statement friday night that it had been asked to investigate tamerlan's ties to potential terror groups, to potential militant groups and that during that inquiry the fbi interviewed tamerlan. and so senator feinstein and some other senators here on capitol hill want to know how is it that tamerlan tsarnaev was able to travel to russia last year for six months and how did he get back into the country given all of that information? and so senator feinstein says there will be a hearing on this perhaps as early as tomorrow to get
declared disaster areas in more than 40 counties. cnn's jim spellman is in illinois where the river has been overflowing since sunday and residents they are they're preparing for even more water. >> the last thing they want to hear about here is another inch of rain coming. i'm not sure it will really make a huge difference. but take a look. two blocks in from the water and it's inundated here a foot up at the edge. three or four feet there at the worst. we haven't seen widespread reports of this kind of damage, but here in spring bay, it's having a huge impact. take a look. last minute prep in spring bay, illinois, as floodwaters inundate this riverside community. where is your home? >> my home is that gray and white mobile home with the black shutters on it. >> you can't get to your home by foot now? >> no. >> have you ever seen this much water come up here? >> no. >> scary? >> yep. >> the home, along with about 40 others in this trailer community, began to flood sunday and the water has continued to rise. >> yesterday i cried all day. >> reporter: and today? >> today i'm not crying y
about you. >> very lovely. >>> someone we also think is lovely, cbs sportscaster jim nantz who we like. he reportedly had an elaborate plan to deal with the blackout at this year's super bowl. most of the superdome went dark in the third quarter. remember that? according to "sports business journal" says nantz he wanted to jump from the broadcast booth, grab a ledge and lower himself into the stands. from there, he wanted to run onto the field and report what was going on. lance barrow who was producing for cbs thought better of the idea and kept nantz in his seat. >> they're probably going thank you, lance barrow. doubt me, don't. jim nantz. >>> live television can be shall we say, a dicey thing, especially when mistakes can last forever on the internet. ben tracy shows us a north dakota tv news anchor who's learning that lesson the hard way. >> reporter: first days on the job can be tough. this one was awful. >> [ bleep ] gay. >> good evening, i'm van tieu. >> a.j. clemente apparently unaware he was on the air swore as he got flustered practicing his lines for hi
three deaths. cnn's jim spellman is in peoria, illinois. >> good morning, christine. you can see the waters coming up here. this is not too unusual here but it's got about another two feet to go. so far these sandbag levees are holding. they hope that remains the case. from north dakota to indiana, to mississippi. flad watches and warning throughout the middle of the country as rain water from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the rising illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move back into their home of 13 years. you were prepared, but what is it like to actually watch your home go under water? >> it's dev
writing. he has been questioned since yesterday. cnn international security analyst jim walsh is joining us with more on what's going on. one of the key questions, the weapons that they have, the weapons that eventually killed an m.i.t. police officer, seriously injured another local law enforcement officer. do we have any idea where they got those weapons? >> not yet. and i think that question also extends to the explosives, as well. but this is an investigation pursuing lots of lines of inquiry both foreign and domestic. i would have to guess, though, that rather than risk acquiring weapons and explosives from abroad, it's much more likely they were acquired domestically. >> these two guys apparently didn't have much money, but enough to buy explosives, pressure cookers, a rifle, long rifle according to the watertown police chief i spoke with. other weapons, as well. >> i'm sure they're already well into the suspect's computer files and financial records. we're getting a mixed picture because on the one hand, they seem to have had a modest style of living. on the other hand, there is t
are working around the clock in 12 hour shifts. days off are cancel. jim avila on how boston most celebrated event turned into a spectacle of blood and screaming. >> 2 hours after the winner crossed. 4 hours 9 minutes in the race amateur runners still filling boston street. 2 rapid fire explosions at the finish line. >> something just blew up. [ screaming]. >>reporter: turning the cherished boston marathon into what one hospital official calls a war zone. >> i crossed the 26 mile marker and i saw the first explosion happen and there was some commotion. i saw fire and smoke and i didn't know what it was and then from about me to where that gentlemen is standing over there i literally saw the garbage barrel explode. i saw the flash. fire. smok smoke. i just ran inside as fast as i koyshtion camera rolling from many angle as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least one of the marathoners. look again as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least one of the marathoners. most of the injuries, though, suffered by spectators who came to sell brit the finish. >> bomb w
this fateing the initial fire. >>reporter: steve says his nephew jim was likely among those killed in wed explosion of the west, texas fert laser plant. >> town lick this with something like that going on, they react and when the he can completion happened. >> like all of west firefighters 52-year-old stef was volunteer with full-time job in town. in case at westec welding that makes firefighters equipment. >> hearing the become hit and everything went black and i just kind of crouched did you know. >>reporter: beside his nephew he also lost his home. >> big old boom. just i mean it was horrible. >> gene lives close to the nursing home that was destroyed kitty corner from the plant. how is your house. >> it's all, everything is, the inside is gone. ceilings and insulation laying on the floor. >>reporter: do you feel lick though that you got out. >> yes. lucky for my wife she was sitting in the living room on the couch and fell on top, the ceiling fell on top of her. >>reporter: he had to pull the mangled garage door off the car to get he and his wife out of the house to safety. am
in meteorologist chad myers and jim spellman. this flooding, widespread there. >> reporter: it's amazing how intense the rain was and how quickly some of these neighbors flooded. you mention almost seven inches of rain in 24 hours, they get three inches of rain on average in the month of april in the chicago area. too much for the ground to take. i'm on the edge of it, a foot from the deepest part. much worse inside the homes. i got a chance to go inside this home, there's a refrigerator and freezer bobbing, three or feet of water, but they could get another inch of rain here later today and into the evening. with the ground this saturated, that could be more flooding for these low-lying areas like elm hurst, john? >> more water they simply don't need, thanks, jim. >> chad myers, people there want to know when this is going to stop. tell us. >> it's been a tremendous amount of rain. i haven't seen training like this in a long time, but it does end tonight, brooke, to answer your question. it's like a train. think about a train on a train track, one car goes directly over where the other car
this morning with more rain sadly in the forecast. i feel terrible saying that. cnn's jim spellman is in one of those towns. he's in peoria, illinois. jim, people there are looking at water levels, i understand, that haven't been this high in more than 60 years. >> since the 1940s since the illinois river here in peoria came up this high. but it's not just peoria. rivers across the midwest are flooding. from north dakota to indiana to mississippi, flood watches and warnings throughout the middle of the country, as rainwater from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the risele illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move ba
of call, and that diamond is the bomber. >> jim cavanagh, thank you so much for that. well, we could find out definitively today if letters sent to president obama and senator roger wicker contain the poison ricin. mississippi police have arrested 45-year-old paul kevin curtis at his home. the fbi says curtis sent three letters, all of which preliminarily tested positive for ricin, and included a final line that red, "i am kc, and i approve this message." 'one size fits all'. it doesn't. that's crazy. we're all totally different. ishares core. etf building blocks for your personalized portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. accomplishing even little things can become major victories. i'm phil mickelson, pro golfer. when i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, my rheumatologist prescribed enbrel for my pain and stiffnes
thing in the world can happen to a city and dumb sportscasters will go, three hours, jim, this city forget there was a nuclear blast. >> something different was going on there. >> here, it can only happen in boston because boston is a one sports team town. at the end of the day, the sox that pull the entire team together. >> fenway. >> and fenway, the cathedral to a city. it had to be an amazing day there. >> it was. it was an amazingly emotional afternoon. it was a cathartic moment. a baseball game happened to have been played but it was if a tiny basilica on the back bay and the region was attracted to it. the suspected suspect had been successfully captured the evening before. neil diamond called the red sox switchboard. >> are you kidding me? >> called the red sox switchboard and said i'm in town, my name is neil diamond. i'd like to come and sing the song and he showed up. >> wow. >> to the surprise -- >> which, of course, people are watching that don't know, that's been a tradition. >> yeah, for a long, long time, many years. middle of the eighth inning, they sing it. >> it's
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13